Queen Anne's County MD Genealogy

Queen Anne's County

MDGenWeb

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I am Rebecca Maloney, Temporary Webmistress and Coordinator for this County, State site. I hope you enjoy your visit. Please email me if you have any suggestions or contributions you would like to make.

Queen Anne's County MD Family History

Queen Anne's County Was Established

Queen Anne's County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, the population was 47,798. Its county seat and most populous municipality is Centreville. The census-designated place of Stevensville is the county's most populous place. The county is named for Queen Anne of Great Britain who reigned when the county was established in 1706.

Queen Anne's County is included in the Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Washington-Baltimore-Arlington, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Combined Statistical Area, and is the easternmost in both. The Chesapeake Bay Bridge connects Queen Anne's of the Eastern Shore to Anne Arundel County on the Western Shore.

Queen Anne's County has two hundred sixty-five miles of waterfront area, much of that being the shores of Kent Island, which stands out from the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay. From the waters of this county, watermen have brought oysters, crabs, and terrapin. Migrating waterfowl overwinter here, and hunting for geese and ducks has been an important part of the county's history. The first settlement in Maryland was on Kent Island on August 21, 1631, and included twenty-five settlers in a manor house, a fort, and other buildings. The settlement was referred to as Winston's Island. The first houses were built similar to log cabins. Although the county has a number of properties on the National Register of Historic Places, the original settlement no longer exists. One of the oldest towns still existing is Stevensville, earlier known as Broad Creek.

Queen Anne's County was organized under a sheriff in 1706, bounded by Talbot, Kent, and Dorchester Counties. In 1713, Queen Anne's County became an English postal district where the sheriff was the postmaster and would travel to Annapolis by boat to obtain mail. In 1773 a part of Queen Anne's County, together with a portion of Dorchester County, was taken to form Caroline County. The county now is enclosed by Talbot, Caroline, and Kent County as well as the Chesapeake Bay.

By the time of Independence, the county had several churches, a government, school, and a postal system.

In 1876, Queen Anne's County had the first printed independent paper called the Maryland Citizen, and a bank, located in Centreville; the Centreville National Bank exists to this day. When the Railroad Company was finished in 1868 it operated from Baltimore around the top of the Chesapeake Bay down to Queenstown, and connected with other railroads that continued east into[4] Delaware as far as Rehoboth, and southward to the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

In the 20th century, Queen Anne's County was the home of Baseball Hall of Famer Jimmie Foxx. There is a statue and small park in Sudlersville, where Foxx grew up.

I hope you find my efforts helpful in your research of YOUR COUNTY roots. I am unable to do additional research on your family as I live in North Carolina and do not have direct access to records. I post everything I have for all to use.

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Surrounding Counties

 

KENT COUNTY

 

 

QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY

KENT COUNTY DE

TALBOT COUNTY

CAROLINE COUNTY

"The Chosen"

We are the chosen. In each family there is one who seems called to find the ancestors. To put flesh on their bones and make them live again. To tell the family story and to feel that somehow they know and approve. Doing genealogy is not a cold gathering of facts but, instead, breathing life into all who have gone before. We are the story tellers of the tribe. All tribes have one. We have been called, as it were, by our genes. Those who have gone before cry out to us: Tell our story. So, we do. In finding them, we somehow find ourselves. How many graves have I stood before now and cried? I have lost count. How many times have I told the ancestors, "You have a wonderful family; you would be proud of us.". How many times have I walked up to a grave and felt somehow there was love there for me? I cannot say. It goes beyond just documenting facts. It goes to who I am, and why I do the things I do. It goes to seeing a cemetery about to be lost forever to weeds and indifference and saying - I can't let this happen. The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it. It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family. It goes to deep pride that the fathers fought and some died to make and keep us a nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before."

by Della M. Cummings Wright; Rewritten by her granddaughter Dell Jo Ann McGinnis Johnson; Edited and Reworded by Tom Dunn, 1943."

 

QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY'S FAMILIES

Veterans Queen Anne's County MD

Veterans of Queen Anne's County

Queen Anne

Queen Anne

Queen Anne's County MD Family Trees

Callister's Ferry

Queen Anne's County MD Genealogy

Wright's Chance

 


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Contact Us

If you have questions, contributions, or problems with this site, email:

Coordinator - Available

State Coordinator: Shari Handley

Asst. State Coordinator: Rebecca Maloney

Questions or Comments?

If you have questions or problems with this site, email the County Coordinator. Please to not ask for specfic research on your family. I am unable to do your personal research. I do not live in Maryland and do not have access to additional records.

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Queen Anne's County MD Genealogy